And Then

The Books

Joseph Andrews

Author: Henry Fielding

Genre: Classics; Satire

Published: 1742

Number of Pages: 272

When Joseph, a chaste and honest footman, resists the advances of his employer Lady Booby, he soon finds himself without a job. He and his old tutor Abraham Adams set out on a journey to visit Joseph’s sweetheart Fanny. Several many misadventures follow.

cover art for Fortunately the milk

Fortunately, the Milk

Author: Neil Gaiman

Genre: Children’s Lit; Sci-FiL Fantasy

Publisher: HarperCollins

Published: November 17, 2013

Number of Pages: 113

Dad had one job: get milk. Instead, he brought home a humdinger of a story.

The Ties That Bind

Joseph Andrews was one of the first novels written in English and was essentially Henry Fielding’s reaction to the novel Pamela. Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded, was an extremely popular book about a fastidiously virtuous maid. Fielding absolutely hated it and wrote the novella Shamela as a direct parody. Joseph Andrews, which follows the story of Shamela’s brother, is an extension of this. Throughout the book, Joseph and his friend Abraham Adams find themselves in improbable circumstances while on a journey to visit Joseph’s sweetheart, Fanny. As the story progresses, the situations become more and more outlandish.

In Fortunately, the Milk, a father is sent out by his children to buy milk. When he returns, he delivers an incredible tale complete with aliens and pirates and dinosaurs and one rather miffed volcano god.

Both books pile on implausible situation after situation and just go with it. They’re both basically using the improv technique “yes and” on steroids. The effect in both stories is to take the reader on a wild and unpredictable ride.

Up Next

Salt Fat Acid Heat by Samin Nosrat and Brownies and Broomsticks by Bailey Cates

merged cover art for Brownies & Broomsticks and Salt Fat Acid Heat

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